- Image of the Day -

 

"Almost Spring"

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  Feature Artist Bio

Ginny Butcher - Almost Spring

Ginny Butcher - Almost Spring

Ginny Butcher - March Skies Over Alcova

Ginny Butcher - March Skies Over Alcova

Ginny Butcher - Ancient Adobe

Ginny Butcher - Ancient Adobe

Ginny Butcher - Still Runs

Ginny Butcher - Still Runs

Ginny Butcher - Evening Still

Ginny Butcher - Evening Still

Ginny Butcher - Wyoming Gold

Ginny Butcher - Wyoming Gold

Ginny Butcher - Summer Shade

Ginny Butcher - Summer Shade

Ginny Butcher - Falling Leaves

Ginny Butcher - Falling Leaves

Ginny Butcher - Footprints in the Snow

Ginny Butcher - Footprints in the Snow

Ginny Butcher - Old Cottonwoods

Ginny Butcher - Old Cottonwoods

Ginny Butcher - Wrapped in Winter

Ginny Butcher - Wrapped in Winter

Ginny Butcher - Winter Light

Ginny Butcher - Winter Light

                                                     

                                                               ARTIST'S OFFICIAL BIO                                                                                             https://ginnybutcher.fineartstudioonline.com/about                                        

 

 

 

Ginny Butcher's

OFFICIAL WEBSITE  

                                           https://ginnybutcher.fineartstudioonline.com/                                                

 

By permission of the artist, The Cyber Art Show is pleased to feature the first of two 12-piece exhibitions of works by contemporary American landscape painter Ginny Butcher (born 1955 in New Hampshire, USA). 
 

You can often find Ginny Butcher heading to a nearby painting site. But it hasnʼt always been that way. Painting in watercolor and drawing the figure were her main focus in the early years of her life. She received tutoring from her mother, a professional artist who worked in Boston before marrying. There were summer classes with local art groups as well, sometimes painting on location, sometimes in the studio. But over the years she could most often be found, pencil in hand, drawing pad on lap, just sitting around drawing whatever was in view.

 

As a young adult she turned down a scholarship opportunity to a reputable art school because “she didnʼt want to paint pictures of toasters and TVs for a living”, preferring instead to pursue other things if she couldnʼt “make paintings of the landscape for a living”. As often happens with many people, life took over and it was 20 years before she returned to the easel. After earning a Fine Arts Degree from the local college, she spent fourteen years as a graphic designer. She began working in pastels shortly after earning her degree in Fine Art and then rediscovered plein air painting, tagging along with her husband, the fisherman when he went in search of brook trout and she in search of a painting.

 

Pastel seemed to be a good fit and soon she was earning awards and recognition for her colorful paintings of the region. But at the end of one summer of teaching an early-morning pastel plein air class, she decided she really wanted to learn to use oils. She loved the look of other artistsʼ work in oils and determined to not pick up a pastel again until she had “mastered” oils. Her first experience with them was enough to solidify the determination to pursue oil painting. Now oils are her preferred medium to work in.

 

Ginny has studied with well-known artists, traveling out of state often, since Wyoming has a higher antelope population than human population and is somewhat isolated from a thriving art community. That isolation can lead to good painting though. Always a lover of the outdoors, Ginny is happy to paint the wide open spaces as well as the cozy corners in the broad landscape around her.

 

Color has always been her focus as well as a challenge since beginning painting. Getting the color right is the key to making a painting that shows the beauty of any subject. She prefers outdoor painting to studio painting as long as the weather is cooperative.

 

Making lots of small outdoor paintings on sunny days provides material for larger studio paintings done when the weather turns cold and windy. Although some artists paint in all weather conditions and donʼt mind overcast scenes, Ginny prefers the bright sunny days, especially early mornings. But she says “you can make a beautiful painting from a not so beautiful scene if you get the color right.”

 

Ginnyʼs work can be found in many collectorʼs homes throughout the nation and abroad.



Shows & Awards

 

2015 Evening Still painting purchased for Nicolaysen Art Museum permanent collection.
- 2014 Fourteenth Annual Governorʼs Capitol Art Exhibition, Cheyenne, WY Juror's Choice Award.

- 2011 Wyoming Plein Air Event, Cheyenne, WY Wyoming Land Trust Purchase Award.

- 2008 Eighth Annual Governorʼs Capitol Art Exhibition, Cheyenne, WY Juror's Choice Award.

2004 Fourth Annual Governorʼs Capitol Art Exhibition, Cheyenne, WY

2003 Where the Buffalo Roam Project, Nicolaysen Art Museum, Casper, WY

2002 Pastel Society of New Mexico 11th Annual National Art Show

2002 Pastel Society of America, Butler Institute of Art, Youngstown, OH

- 2002 Rocky Mountain Regional Biennial, MOCA, Ft Collins, CO

- 2002 Top 40, Wyoming Conservation Stamp Competition

2001 Congressional Show

- 2001 University of Wyoming Travel Show

 Gallery #493 

        April 5, 2017

Twelve Pieces by Contemporary Artist

                     Ginny Butcher (Born 1955)

                     ARTIST'S STATEMENT


“I always try to create paintings that give one the feel of the place; that sense of “Iʼve been there!” I like to paint on location when itʼs nice out. This way I can see nuances and colors that just arenʼt possible to get from a photo. When I do larger paintings I use my small outdoor paintings as my reference. When youʼve spent a few hours somewhere studying the scene with a paint brush and canvas you remember much more than if you just snap a photo on your way by. Remembering the sounds, temperatures, weather and any events during the painting session brings a deeper dimension to the larger studio paintings, so others can enjoy the scene as much as I did at the time of painting it.